Grayling bobbers - how to use them

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Michael
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Re: Grayling bobbers - how to use them

Post by Michael » Sat Jan 03, 2015 9:27 am

I think that's one, if not the best benefit of Reg Righynis floats Nobby, over the "bobber". Using the lightest float you can get away with, so the float lifts easily as well as sinks. I`ve had a lot of takes, where the grayling comes up from the bottom or lower region, takes the bait, supporting the tell tale shot, and the float lifts perceptibly. Dependant on the swim, I`ve had takes a good 50-75yds, though the eyes are starting to let me down. I don't actual like the heavy bodied float, unless its for carrying a huge lobworm, for perch for example. I dislike like the idea of having a float which will, by its size, cause deep hooking in smaller fish...
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Nobby
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Re: Grayling bobbers - how to use them

Post by Nobby » Sat Jan 03, 2015 10:39 am

That's a good example of the right float for the job, Michael. It would be easy to use a very buoyant bobber to tell the true bite from a perch, for example, as opposed to a disabling nibble. Yet a smaller fish might be gorging that hook deeply before that buoyant float told you so.

That's OK ( if you must) when you're fishing for the pot but it certainly isn't if you hope to catch and release.

I watch Americans fishing with very buoyant bobbers holding lures beneath them for predatory fish and it appals me. Perhaps that's why we don't see bobber floats as much as we used to nowadays?

Now I should say that I have yet to catch a grayling, my few attempts at deliberately targeting them have been laughable, but if they truly do get deeply hooked in the manner of perch, and taking in to account their tenuous hold on life after being hooked, it seems to me that the right float for the job is even more important.

I hadn't heard of them giving 'lift' bites before, now my next attempt at them is going to be even more fretful! :Brickwall:

Actually, I'm getting to the stage where I don't want to achieve all my 'bucket list' fishing targets now in case I drop dead on the bankside immediately after ticking one off......

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Olly
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Re: Grayling bobbers - how to use them

Post by Olly » Sat Jan 03, 2015 11:29 am

Have a look at the Hardy grayling floats - similar to a pike bung in miniature! One on ebay at the moment. I think the buoyancy is required especially in fast water inc floods but also to avoid the huge boulders in Scottish rivers which southern rivers do not have.

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Match Aerial
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Re: Grayling bobbers - how to use them

Post by Match Aerial » Sat Jan 03, 2015 11:45 am

I think its a bit of an out dated design, but they do have there uses still, the floats made by Phil are excellent examples.
Fast, very shallow water sometimes inches deep its one of the only float that will work in these cases.
It was also used "Sink and Draw" don't forget
Last edited by Match Aerial on Sat Jan 03, 2015 4:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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CWK
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Re: Grayling bobbers - how to use them

Post by CWK » Sat Jan 03, 2015 11:52 am

Grayling , in my experience , have a tendency to swallow a bait deep into their throats if the rig isn't correctly set up . For this reason I never use a feeder or ledger when targeting them . There are several float designs one can use dependent upon the river conditions ranging from Trent Trotters in very fast shallow water to thick tipped Avon styles in deeper slower water . Horses for courses ....

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Michael
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Re: Grayling bobbers - how to use them

Post by Michael » Sat Jan 03, 2015 12:11 pm

Nobby wrote:That's a good example of the right float for the job, Michael. It would be easy to use a very buoyant bobber to tell the true bite from a perch, for example, as opposed to a disabling nibble. Yet a smaller fish might be gorging that hook deeply before that buoyant float told you so.

That's OK ( if you must) when you're fishing for the pot but it certainly isn't if you hope to catch and release.

I watch Americans fishing with very buoyant bobbers holding lures beneath them for predatory fish and it appals me. Perhaps that's why we don't see bobber floats as much as we used to nowadays?

Now I should say that I have yet to catch a grayling, my few attempts at deliberately targeting them have been laughable, but if they truly do get deeply hooked in the manner of perch, and taking in to account their tenuous hold on life after being hooked, it seems to me that the right float for the job is even more important.

I hadn't heard of them giving 'lift' bites before, now my next attempt at them is going to be even more fretful! :Brickwall:

Actually, I'm getting to the stage where I don't want to achieve all my 'bucket list' fishing targets now in case I drop dead on the bankside immediately after ticking one off......
We are only talking a knats "do das" Nobby, its more of like the float hasn't settled properly, I`ve never been good at descriptions. I`ll forsake aesthetics over reliability and practicality any day of the week, welfare of the fish and all that entails ...
Firebird wrote:If you want a float for seeing at distance why not just use a thick straight piece of balsa? It will be just as "buoyant" (really a property of water) as a bobber and easier to make. Perhaps not as floaty looking though.
Totally agree, one doesn't want to become blinkered to one design, no evolution and all that. I`ve got floats of various designs to overcome similar situations, necessity being the mother of invention........
CWK wrote:Grayling , in my experience , have a tendency to swallow a bait deep into their throats if the rig isn't correctly set up . For this reason I never use a feeder or ledger when targeting them ....
I see where your coming from CWK, the rig must be correctly set up, I`ve fished for Grayling using a feeder or ledger style, and from memory I`ve never had a problem with deep hooking, I`ve found its all down to the hook length and good indication....The only time I suffered from deep hooking is when plagued my small perch or minnows

PS Please note, deep hooking relates to float only....
Last edited by Michael on Sat Jan 03, 2015 2:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
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Olly
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Re: Grayling bobbers - how to use them

Post by Olly » Sat Jan 03, 2015 12:14 pm

Never had a problem with feeder or ledger - usually used when the river is flooded or/and highly coloured.

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Match Aerial
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Re: Grayling bobbers - how to use them

Post by Match Aerial » Sat Jan 03, 2015 4:30 pm

Modern alternatives would be a tiny avon float or a one swan shot loafer float, particularly the former with increased sensitivity.

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Santiago
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Re: Grayling bobbers - how to use them

Post by Santiago » Sat Jan 03, 2015 4:36 pm

When I fished the Itchen we caught loads of grayling using a 2 1/2 swan loafer; which was especially effective in very fast runs!

The main problem with bobbers is the disturbance they cause when reeled in!
"....he felt the gentle touch on the line and he was happy"

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Olly
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Re: Grayling bobbers - how to use them

Post by Olly » Sat Jan 03, 2015 4:48 pm

All very well being a 'one type of float person' but the swim you are fishing should dictate what floats are suitable!

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