Replacing a Spliced-In Tip?

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Banksy
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Replacing a Spliced-In Tip?

Post by Banksy » Mon Dec 31, 2018 12:19 pm

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I have been given a rod which is 11', in two sections, the butt being of whole cane, and the tip section is whole cane with a length of Greenheart or other wood spliced in.
There are two top sections, which are pretty well identical.
Sadly, one of the tips is broken, though I still have the broken piece with its tip ring, and the other has a very bad set.
No markings on the rod, apart from Made in England stamped on the brass butt cap.

The rod feels good in the hand, and I would like to have a have a go at restoring it.
I can replace the crumbling cork handle, but wonder if it is feasible to replace the Greenheart section with split cane, perhaps from an old fly rod, or even a glass fibre tip.

But how to remove the old Greenheart from the whole cane into which it is spliced?
I have removed ferrules before, but obviously, holding the splice over a gas flame would be a bad idea!

Am I on a hiding to nothing here?

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Reedling
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Re: Replacing a Spliced-In Tip?

Post by Reedling » Mon Dec 31, 2018 1:46 pm

Try Using the hot setting of the wife's hair dryer to free the joint.

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MGs
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Re: Replacing a Spliced-In Tip?

Post by MGs » Mon Dec 31, 2018 2:50 pm

Reedling wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 1:46 pm
Try Using the hot setting of the wife's hair dryer to free the joint.
Either that or a paint stripping heat gun. I've used one to remove ferrules and loosen glue when I needed to re-laminate cane sections. Go careful if you use it on the hot setting as it may scorch. If you keep it moving it should be fine.
As it is an old rod, the glue under the whipping of the splice may not need too much effort to get it free.
Old car owners never die....they just rust away

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Tengisgol
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Re: Replacing a Spliced-In Tip?

Post by Tengisgol » Tue Jan 01, 2019 9:24 am

I have cut them at the splice and then carefully drilled out, starting with a fine drill for a pilot hole. Once you have a reasonable sized hole you can then pick out the remaining bits around the edges with something thin and pointy (I have some old ladies hair clips!).
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Banksy
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Re: Replacing a Spliced-In Tip?

Post by Banksy » Tue Jan 01, 2019 11:48 am

I'll try the heat treatment first, then if necessary, the careful drilling out. At least I have two top sections on which to practice!

The, if that's successful, there is another nice little rod which needs fettling in the same way.
It does get hold of you, this restoration stuff, doesn't it?

Thanks for your advice, Gentlemen.
:Hat:

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Banksy
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Re: Replacing a Spliced-In Tip?

Post by Banksy » Tue Jan 01, 2019 4:47 pm

A further note on this topic -

I removed the old whipping from the cane / Greenheart splice, and heated it up over a gas burner, careful not to scorch it.
Then tried to remove the tip, without success.
After several attempts, I was starting to urn the cane, so will revert to the drilling out approach.

Then it occurred to me to try straightening the badly bent Greenheart tip over the gas flame.
The wood was just about hot enough so I could not touch it, then I bent it and held it in a curve opposite to the original set.
After three goes, it is now as straight as a die. So I have one entire useable rod.
At least until I use it. I suspect that fix was too easy, and that the set will return after a couple of decent fish, but we'll see.

Back on to H&H now for the bits to refurbish it.

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