Book about the Lea

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Stathamender
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Book about the Lea

Post by Stathamender » Sat Mar 10, 2018 2:02 pm

This https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/ ... -edgelands might be of interest to people here.
Iain

'You may say I'm a dreamer but I am not the only one.......'

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Duckett
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Re: Book about the Lea

Post by Duckett » Sat Mar 10, 2018 5:39 pm

Stathamender wrote:
Sat Mar 10, 2018 2:02 pm
This https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/ ... -edgelands might be of interest to people here.
Thanks for this. I notice it’s compared to Sebald, who I found very hard going at my only effort, but sounds worth a read.
From "... the wilds of the Wirral, whose wayward people both God and good men have quite given up on ...".

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Re: Book about the Lea

Post by Stathamender » Sat Mar 10, 2018 7:39 pm

Duckett wrote:
Sat Mar 10, 2018 5:39 pm
Stathamender wrote:
Sat Mar 10, 2018 2:02 pm
This https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/ ... -edgelands might be of interest to people here.
Thanks for this. I notice it’s compared to Sebald, who I found very hard going at my only effort, but sounds worth a read.
I'm a big Sebald fan, partly because I'm also a fan of Sir Thomas Browne who was a major influence on him and partly because no-one else, other than his imitators, writes like that, although I would allow he's not exactly a barrel of laughs. The Rings of Saturn, an account of a walking trip in Suffolk, is probably the best way in to his stuff. When reading him I feel that this is what it must be like to be a ghost.
Iain

'You may say I'm a dreamer but I am not the only one.......'

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Duckett
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Re: Book about the Lea

Post by Duckett » Sat Mar 10, 2018 7:55 pm

I’m ashamed to say that I have not heard of Sir Thomas Browne. However, having just done a quick on-line check about him, he reminds me rather of Montaigne, of whom I am a great fan. I may not revisit Sebald (though I can understand why great German artists born in the 1930s and 1940s aren’t a bundle of laughs but do have important things to say) but I can see myself seeking out something by Browne. Out of interest, is there anything you would recommend to a novice?
From "... the wilds of the Wirral, whose wayward people both God and good men have quite given up on ...".

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Stathamender
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Re: Book about the Lea

Post by Stathamender » Sun Mar 11, 2018 11:27 am

Duckett wrote:
Sat Mar 10, 2018 7:55 pm
I’m ashamed to say that I have not heard of Sir Thomas Browne. However, having just done a quick on-line check about him, he reminds me rather of Montaigne, of whom I am a great fan. I may not revisit Sebald (though I can understand why great German artists born in the 1930s and 1940s aren’t a bundle of laughs but do have important things to say) but I can see myself seeking out something by Browne. Out of interest, is there anything you would recommend to a novice?
I've seen Browne described as 'The English Montaigne'. There's a number of free editions of his works available on the internet see https://www.google.co.uk/search?client= ... ree+online. Religio Medici is usually thought of as the best place to start.
Iain

'You may say I'm a dreamer but I am not the only one.......'

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Re: Book about the Lea

Post by Duckett » Sun Mar 11, 2018 11:29 am

Stathamender wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 11:27 am
Duckett wrote:
Sat Mar 10, 2018 7:55 pm
I’m ashamed to say that I have not heard of Sir Thomas Browne. However, having just done a quick on-line check about him, he reminds me rather of Montaigne, of whom I am a great fan. I may not revisit Sebald (though I can understand why great German artists born in the 1930s and 1940s aren’t a bundle of laughs but do have important things to say) but I can see myself seeking out something by Browne. Out of interest, is there anything you would recommend to a novice?
I've seen Browne described as 'The English Montaigne'. There's a number of free editions of his works available on the internet see https://www.google.co.uk/search?client= ... ree+online. Religio Medici is usually thought of as the best place to start.
Many thanks for this Iain.

Phil
From "... the wilds of the Wirral, whose wayward people both God and good men have quite given up on ...".

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